Re: Twine games and the harassment of Zoe Quinn

instarbooks:

Hi, we’re Instar Books, and in Spring 2015 we’re publishing the electronic book Videogames for Humans, edited by game designer and critic merritt kopas. Videogames for Humans is a collection of Twine games, presented both as the game files themselves and as text playthroughs, with reactions by…

Anonymous said: You seem to have a lot of time on your hands. Perhaps doing something that actually does a little good, instead of spouting Anita/Bill O'Rielly bullshit?

I am glad you asked! I write books and draw comics, in addition to my job. Some of them are available on this tumblr if you’d like to browse.

Valve Corporation: Black out Steam access for 1 hr to protest the harassment of Anita Sarkeesian & threats against women in games.

A signal from a major games hub like Steam that this kind of behavior is not okay would carry some weight. Consider signing?

the only antidote to FEAR is COURTNEY LOVE

the only antidote to FEAR is COURTNEY LOVE

imaginethewilsonbrothers:

The Beach Boys + Text Posts ~^__^~

(Made by Rebekah~)

i feel this is correct

housingworksbookstore:

We are so thrilled to be working with the very fine folks at orbooks on a new book: Tales of Two Cities: The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York. A portion of proceeds from book sales will benefit Housing Works, and we are working on a not-to-be-missed launch event here a the bookstore in October; stay tuned for details!
The book is edited by John Freeman, illustrated by Molly Crabapple, and features and amazing roster of writers: 
GARNETTE CADOGAN, BILL CHENG, TEJU COLE, LYDIA DAVIS, JONATHAN DEE, JUNOT DIAZ, MARK DOTY, DAVE EGGERS, JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER, D.W. GIBSON, CHAASADAHYAH JACKSON, SARAH JAFFE, LAWRENCE JOSEPH, VICTOR LaVALLE, VALERIA LUISELLI, COLUM McCANN, DINAW MENGESTU, TÉA OBREHT, PATRICK RYAN, MICHAEL SALU, ROSIE SCHAAP, TAIYE SELASI, AKHIL SHARMA, ZADIE SMITH, JEANNE THORNTON, HANNAH TINTI, MARIA VENEGAS, and EDMUND WHITE.
More on the book:
Growing inequality is today a world-wide phenomenon. But it is at its most acute in the “world cities” where the rich choose to live (or invest their fortunes in real estate). Nowhere is this more evident than New York City, where the top 1% earns upwards of $500,000/year, while 22,000 children are homeless.
What does this chasm of wealth feel like to people who live and work in NYC? The stories in Tales of Two Cities mix fiction and reportage to convey the indignities and heartbreak, the callousness and solidarities, of living side-by-side with people who have a stupefyingly different income.
In these pages we read of the polarizing effect of a violent attack on the Q train as it crosses the Manhattan Bridge, of the subterranean lives of homeless people who must find a bed in the city’s underground tunnels, and of the rage felt by a millionaire at being stuck in a snowstorm. We hear of the stresses that burgeoning gentrification can bring to neighbors in a Brooklyn apartment block, and of the way destitution in India shapes the perception of poverty in New York for an immigrant from the sub-continent. We walk past the luxury pet spas and yoga studios that have opened next to cheap hair braiding salons and detox clinics in Hamilton Heights, witness the shenanigans of seriously alienated night shift paralegals, and find out what it’s like to be a housing defendant standing up for tenants whose landlords go to shocking lengths to raise rents.
Eschewing more direct sociological or economic analysis, the pieces here focus on the human dimension of penury and profligacy coexisting in the tightest of quarters. In his successful election campaign, Mayor Bill de Blasio referred often to the “tale of two cities” that is life in today’s New York. With writing that will move the reader, not just emotionally but perhaps, too, to action, this anthology gives life to the meaning of those words in the streets and buildings of the metropolis.
A portion of the proceeds from this book will go to Housing Works.

Hey I have a piece in this everyone / it is about my final days before moving away from new york city, working in independent publishing as a trans woman, and the cruel betrayal of friends / if these subjects interest you then get yr copy today I guess!

housingworksbookstore:

We are so thrilled to be working with the very fine folks at orbooks on a new book: Tales of Two Cities: The Best and Worst of Times in Today’s New York. A portion of proceeds from book sales will benefit Housing Works, and we are working on a not-to-be-missed launch event here a the bookstore in October; stay tuned for details!

The book is edited by John Freeman, illustrated by Molly Crabapple, and features and amazing roster of writers: 

GARNETTE CADOGAN, BILL CHENG, TEJU COLE, LYDIA DAVIS, JONATHAN DEE, JUNOT DIAZ, MARK DOTY, DAVE EGGERS, JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER, D.W. GIBSON, CHAASADAHYAH JACKSON, SARAH JAFFE, LAWRENCE JOSEPH, VICTOR LaVALLE, VALERIA LUISELLI, COLUM McCANN, DINAW MENGESTU, TÉA OBREHT, PATRICK RYAN, MICHAEL SALU, ROSIE SCHAAP, TAIYE SELASI, AKHIL SHARMA, ZADIE SMITH, JEANNE THORNTON, HANNAH TINTI, MARIA VENEGAS, and EDMUND WHITE.

More on the book:

Growing inequality is today a world-wide phenomenon. But it is at its most acute in the “world cities” where the rich choose to live (or invest their fortunes in real estate). Nowhere is this more evident than New York City, where the top 1% earns upwards of $500,000/year, while 22,000 children are homeless.

What does this chasm of wealth feel like to people who live and work in NYC? The stories in Tales of Two Cities mix fiction and reportage to convey the indignities and heartbreak, the callousness and solidarities, of living side-by-side with people who have a stupefyingly different income.

In these pages we read of the polarizing effect of a violent attack on the Q train as it crosses the Manhattan Bridge, of the subterranean lives of homeless people who must find a bed in the city’s underground tunnels, and of the rage felt by a millionaire at being stuck in a snowstorm. We hear of the stresses that burgeoning gentrification can bring to neighbors in a Brooklyn apartment block, and of the way destitution in India shapes the perception of poverty in New York for an immigrant from the sub-continent. We walk past the luxury pet spas and yoga studios that have opened next to cheap hair braiding salons and detox clinics in Hamilton Heights, witness the shenanigans of seriously alienated night shift paralegals, and find out what it’s like to be a housing defendant standing up for tenants whose landlords go to shocking lengths to raise rents.

Eschewing more direct sociological or economic analysis, the pieces here focus on the human dimension of penury and profligacy coexisting in the tightest of quarters. In his successful election campaign, Mayor Bill de Blasio referred often to the “tale of two cities” that is life in today’s New York. With writing that will move the reader, not just emotionally but perhaps, too, to action, this anthology gives life to the meaning of those words in the streets and buildings of the metropolis.

A portion of the proceeds from this book will go to Housing Works.

Hey I have a piece in this everyone / it is about my final days before moving away from new york city, working in independent publishing as a trans woman, and the cruel betrayal of friends / if these subjects interest you then get yr copy today I guess!

http://pinebark.tumblr.com/post/94908934332/thinking-about-a-lot-of-things-imogen-and-stephen

pinebark:

thinking about a lot of things imogen and stephen have said about marginalized people’s lit and it feels like it’s hard for us to break out of this stage of like, speaking in the language of the cisnormative culture that we’re all struggling with sometimes? or i guess of like, assuming that all…

I relate—I also am not sure how possible it is to exist outside of history. There’s no way to see one’s work like AS HISTORY WILL SEE IT, to be “right” in that way—the best anyone can hope for is either (1) have the courage to write whatever out of pure id forces and count one’s scruples to catch anything too messed up in the process of publishing, or (2) try to have one’s experience of the world and how one relates to/talks about it gradually cease to resemble cisnormativity—finding people you relate to, relating to them, recognizing or anxiously predicting real conflicts that arise from those relationships, all messy human stuff—and then accurately record your own transformed life. There are probably more than these two methods but I think both of these are useful and depend more on taste, so the ultimate goal becomes yet again just finding a taste and INFLICTING IT on the world in a way that you trust the world to push back against? Maybe this is awful, but I don’t know of any other way to do it kinda without paralysis

odofemi:

Jeanne Thornton’s The Black Emerald, freshly released on the new Instar Books (an imprint of OR Books), is one of the strangest things I’ve read in a long time. A collection of seven short stories and two novellas, this book really feels like it was written by someone who lives in a version of reality just slightly askew to our own. I devoured this book in just under twenty-four hours because I couldn’t put it down.
The closing novella, Myra’s Seven Conversations, has stuck in my mind as one of the best and strangest parts of the collection. It’s reminicent, to me, in some ways of Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle. And the opening titular novella brings to mind both Caitlín R. Kiernan’s work and Billy Martin’s (formerly, Poppy Z Brite) novel Drawing Blood, for an overall pulp comic Lovecraftian bizarreness that ends both mysteriously and abruptly. Both of these are worth the price of admission alone, but between them are seven very odd and humourous stories.
I highly recommend this for lovers of weird fiction, and for readers of trans fiction and queer fiction. You need to read this! Jeanne Thornton is worth reading an ebook for.
It’s available online for only $10 and worth every penny!

!!! omgggg a comparison to WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE is like … a dream thing kind of!

odofemi:

Jeanne Thornton’s The Black Emerald, freshly released on the new Instar Books (an imprint of OR Books), is one of the strangest things I’ve read in a long time. A collection of seven short stories and two novellas, this book really feels like it was written by someone who lives in a version of reality just slightly askew to our own. I devoured this book in just under twenty-four hours because I couldn’t put it down.

The closing novella, Myra’s Seven Conversations, has stuck in my mind as one of the best and strangest parts of the collection. It’s reminicent, to me, in some ways of Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle. And the opening titular novella brings to mind both Caitlín R. Kiernan’s work and Billy Martin’s (formerly, Poppy Z Brite) novel Drawing Blood, for an overall pulp comic Lovecraftian bizarreness that ends both mysteriously and abruptly. Both of these are worth the price of admission alone, but between them are seven very odd and humourous stories.

I highly recommend this for lovers of weird fiction, and for readers of trans fiction and queer fiction. You need to read this! Jeanne Thornton is worth reading an ebook for.

It’s available online for only $10 and worth every penny!

!!! omgggg a comparison to WE HAVE ALWAYS LIVED IN THE CASTLE is like … a dream thing kind of!

Sweetest Fruit is the Sun

So you cruise up 110 to the municipal ziggurat where you’ll meet Eddie Corot’s elopement guy and tie the knot soon, your fiancée you guess’s right hand smoking and her left holding her ribbon on against the convertible wind. You merge in and out of traffic, the radio static but unwilling for the moment to change it. Ashes strike your windshield and the sucking sound of the city and Doppler traffic surrounds your ears, and for a moment you try to pretend that you are an alien so that this will all seem as new and promising as you want it to.